yellow

Let me count the ways

I adore stumble upon

Forever its slave

haiku high five?

Seriously though, you know that you are a nerd when a significant portion of the things that come up are related to writing, reading, and/or other geeky factual tidbits.

From me to you, enjoy.


Bernadette Mayer's Writing Experiments

* Systematically eliminate the use of certain kinds of words or phrases from
a piece of writing: eliminate all adjectives from a poem of your own, or
take out all words beginning with 's' in Shakespeare's sonnets.
* Rewrite someone else's writing. Experiment with theft and plagiarism.
* Systematically derange the language: write a work consisting only of
prepositional phrases, or, add a gerund to every line of an already existing
work. 
* Get a group of words, either randomly selected or thought up, then form
these words (only) into a piece of writing-whatever the words allow. Let
them demand their own form, or, use some words in a predetermined way.
Design words. 
* Eliminate material systematically from a piece of your own writing until
it is "ultimately" reduced, or, read or write it backwards, line by line or
word by word. Read a novel backwards.
* Using phrases relating to one subject or idea, write about another,
pushing metaphor and simile as far as you can. For example, use science
terms to write about childhood or philosophic language to describe a shirt.
* Take an idea, anything that interests you, or an object, then spend a few
days looking and noticing, perhaps making notes on what comes up about that
idea, or, try to create a situation or surrounding where everything that
happens is in relation.
* Construct a poem as if the words were three-dimensional objects to be
handled in space. Print them on large cards or bricks if necessary.
* Write as you think, as close as you can come to this, that is, put pen to
paper and don't stop. Experiment writing fast and writing slow.
* Attempt tape recorder work, that is, recording without a text, perhaps at
specific times. 
* Make notes on what happens or occurs to you for a limited amount of time,
then make something of it in writing.
* Get someone to write for you, pretending they are you.
* Write in a strict form, or, transform prose into a poetic form.
* Write a poem that reflects another poem, as in a mirror.

http://www.writing.upenn.edu/library/Mayer-Bernadette_Experiments.html


100 best first lines from novels

3. A screaming comes across the sky. - Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow (1973)
8. It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen. - George Orwell, 1984 (1949)
15. The sun shone, having no alternative, on the nothing new. —Samuel Beckett, Murphy (1938)
32. Where now? Who now? When now? - Samuel Beckett, The Unnamable (1953; trans. Patrick Bowles)
35. It was like so, but wasn't. - Richard Powers, Galatea 2.2 (1995)
38. All this happened, more or less. - Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five (1969)
61. I have never begun a novel with more misgiving. - W. Somerset Maugham, The Razor's Edge 
 (1944)


http://www.pantagraph.com/news/article_a125216a-649f-5414-88b5-76a688ea3b6a.html

Bedtime calculator


http://sleepyti.me/



thisisjustcool


101 ways to arouse your creativity!


http://writetodone.com/2010/06/28/201-ways-to-arouse-your-creativity/




		
		






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One response to “yellow

  1. I love stumbleupon!!!! Best procrastination tool. Ever.

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